Engagement and Communications Plan

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Running Head: ENGAGEMENT AND COMMUNICATIONS PLAN 1

Engagementand Communications Plan

Nameof Student

Nameof Institution

Engagementand Communications Plan

Stakeholderengagement and communication is one of the most significant functionsof an organization. The importance of the stakeholder communicationis informed by the crucial role in guiding the future direction of afirm. The purpose of this paper is to research and discuss thevarious aspects of differences among stakeholders that must beaddressed in effective communication and engagement. The paper alsoevaluates the rationales employed in determining if, and how tocommunicate with particular stakeholders for MacDonald’s. The paperis divided into three sections, mainly overview of the differences,research-based rationale for selected activities and tables thatrepresent the various aspects of communication and engagement.

Anoverview of the cultural, legal, and ethical stakeholder differencesthat must be addressed through engagement and communication

Thereare various stakeholder differences that must be dealt with throughcommitment and communication. However, that is only possible afterstakeholders of the MacDonald’s mapping have been done. Each of thedifferences must, therefore, be addressed in each and every group ofthe stakeholders. The owners of the organization, who includeinvestors, shareholders, agents, analysts, and rating agencies mustbe engaged and communicated to in a way that reflects theirdifferences. Their cultural and religious differences must becarefully addressed so that no element of communication or engagementignores the distinct differences among the group (McPhail, 2002).Communication to the owners should be sensitive enough so that noneof the group members feel left out in the commitment by thesedifferences. Cultural aspects among the owners play the crucial rolein informing their individual differences. Any communication thatdoes not put into account the diversity regarding culture andreligion could fuel unnecessary conflict and hence interfere with thesmooth running of MacDonald’s. Their background regarding raceshould also be considered so that no statement during the engagementhurts any aspects of these diversities of the owners (McPhail, 2002).The legal differences among the owners must be addressed so that thenumber of shares or stake of each of them is put into an account toavoid any misunderstanding. During the communication and engagementwith the owners, personal and professional ethics must be adhered toso that the communication is seen to have been conducted in a waythat considers the role and responsibilities of each of the owners.

Thedifferences among MacDonald’s customers, who include directclients, indirect customers, and advocates, must be addressed. Theircultural differences must be dealt with so that the organizationresponds to the full range of diversity among the customers. Thiswould prove that the body recognizes the pivotal role customers playin the organization. The organization must always engage andcommunicate in a way that captures the difference of the customers inline with their cultural differences. The legal differences must beaddressed so that no legal issue is ignored. For example food itemsthat could inform the need of legal tussles should be dealt with, atthe earliest opportunity. The organization should expound how thecustomers should deal with any emerging ethical issues (McPhail,2002). The customers should also be adequately addressed so that therelationship between the two groups is promoted.

Aho,&amp Bennett,( 2013), argues that, to communicate and engage withthe employees, who include the current, retirees and future employeestogether with their dependants, it is pivotal that the communicationreflects their cultural differences regarding their religion, beliefsand practices so that the engagements are active in their objective.The employees would also appreciate any engagements that acknowledgeand address their cultural practices and their backgrounds (Aho, &ampBennett, 2013). Issues of culture are sensitive and failure to makedeliberate efforts to address them could have serious ramificationson the relationship between the employees and the firm.Communications and engagements that could lead to the emergence oflegal issues among the employees should be addressed too. In linewith professional ethics, the differences in their various aspects ofethics must be reflected in all their communications so that theengagement has the most desired effect on the group of stakeholders.

McPhail,(2002), is of the view that external stakeholders such as suppliers,media and opinion leaders should be engaged and communicated to insuch a way that their cultural differences are put into account .Foodis culturally sensitive and responsive and any misunderstandings ofculture could have dire consequences for MacDonald’s. Poorcommunication or engagement could lead to legal actions too.

McPhail,(2002), says that stakeholders such as the entire external community,chambers of commerce, particular groups, environment, government andcivil societies, all cultural, ethical and legal differences must beaddressed. This is due to the fact an organization serves a broadrange of groups either directly or indirectly and failure to focus ontheir differences could have adverse repercussions to theorganization (McPhail, 2002). Their cultural, legal and ethicaldifferences must be addressed in engagements and communication sothat none feels left out or hurt by the endeavors.

Aresearch-based rationale for the activities selected to engage eachof the stakeholders or stakeholder groups.

Accordingto research by Victoria, (2005), the rationale for the activities arechosen to include the contribution of the speaker or the group of thestakeholder to the organization. The activities which includeconferences, seminars, and team building activities are all dependenton the contribution that the speakers make to MacDonald’s as anorganization. The higher or the more sensitive a stakeholder is, thehigher the value attached to the activities employed. In thiscontext, the information or the expertise that the stakeholder has,that could influence the organization, is focused and ultimatelydetermines the actions that the company uses to engage suchshareholders.

Anotherrationale for the activities selected is the legitimacy of engagement(Larson-Keagy, Community College National Center for CommunityEngagement., &amp Global Engagement of Multifaceted Stakeholders(GEMS) project (2000-2003), 2003). The genuineness of the engagementis considered so that the more genuine the need to engage is thehigher the levels of activities selected in the meeting with thestakeholder. The legality of the requirement by the stakeholder toengage is also considering hence ultimately determining theactivities employed in engaging such stakeholders. The willingness ofthe speaker to engage is another rationale used in the selection ofthe activities to engage the stakeholders. This is because thestakeholders may not be willing to participate and hence cannot becompelled to do so.

Anotherrationale applied in the selection of activities is the influence ofthe stakeholders. The question that is answered is who thestakeholder influences. Activities selected to engage them wouldlargely be dependent on this factor.

Thenecessity of involvement is the other rationale for the activitieschosen to engage the stakeholders at MacDonald’s. The importance ofthe engagement is considered before other plans of the meeting couldbe made. If the participation is not necessary, then it is as wellrejected or postponed based on the assessment of the organization.

Fromresearch, expectations of the stakeholder are one of the rationalesfor selecting activities to communicate with the stakeholders(European Commission, 2004). MacDonald’s is aware of the hopes thatthe stakeholders have before any communication could be made. Theorganizations, therefore, select activities that capture theexpectation of the stakeholder and is well managed to avoid anyconflict or dashing of hopes due to its extensive network.

Anotherresearch –based rationale for selecting activities to communicateto the stakeholders is a rationale that allows for equal contribution(McPhail, 2002). Less verbal stakeholders are encouraged toparticipate in the conversation while respecting the rights of all inthe communication so that an atmosphere of fairness is created andpromoted.

Anotherresearch –based used is the focus of the discussion concerning theareas covered by the communication (McPhail, 2002). Therefore, theactivities selected are based on the scope of the discussion so thatthe more the scope, the more the activities selected. Thecommunicating focus or discussion is dependent on its importance, andhence, the activities were chosen.

Managingof the cultural dynamics is another rationale for activities selectedto communicate to the MacDonald’s stakeholders (Yoo, &amp AsianDevelopment Bank Institute, 2005). The activities selected must aimat managing any cultural issues that could arise in the process ofcommunication. The activities must have the capacity to address anycultural misunderstandings that may arise in the process ofcommunication.

Finally,the other rationale for selecting of activities is their ability tomitigate tensions by avoiding provocative topics (McPhail, 2002).Activities that could lead to controversies should be prevented atall times. The activities selected should calm any rivalry thatexists at the date of communicating so that unwarrantedmisinterpretation is avoided. Harmony is a vital element incommunication, and every effort should be made to promote it duringcommunications. This mainly informed by the sensitive nature ofproducts in the organization.

Thetables represent the various aspects of communication and engagementat MacDonald’s

Internal stakeholders

Team/ group

External stakeholders

Senior leadership members

Bill Andrew

Catherine Martha

Other leaders

Edward Tim

Senior leaders

Val Valeria

Peer groups

Melisa Key

John Smith

Member

John Paul

Auditor

Carol Johnson

Employees

Daniel Jack

Ivan Koji

Fellow colleague

Shaw Mayor

Employees and other staff

John Duce

Figure Two

Stakeholders

Melissa paul

Current Position

Board member

Interest

Overseer

Desired Position

Team leader

Ability to promote transparency and accountability

Understanding of transparency and accountability

Bill Andrew

Executive member of the Board

  • Strives for excellence in what he does

  • Enjoys trying out new ideas in business

  • Accountability in any business venture

Has the ability and understanding of all transparency and accountability aspects of the entire organization

Catherine Martha

Executive member of the Board

  • Interested in transparency at the firm

  • Strict on junior employees

  • Keen on integrity regarding financial matters

Has overseen accountability at the firm

The junior employees have demonstrated accountability and transparency in all their activities

Edward Tim

Chief Financial Officer

  • Concerned with financial expenditures in the company

  • Cautious on inappropriate use of funds at the company

The financial expenditures can be accounted for

Val Valeria

Financial Officer

  • Works by the rules of the organization

  • Careful on business transactions involving the use of funds

Adherence to the rules of the organization

Business transactions are above board, with every detail explained

Melisa Key

Deputy Financial Officer

  • Advocates transparency and accountability

  • Strict on junior staff

Transparency and accountability demonstrated

Staff responsible for their actions with details explained

John Smith

Chief Accountant

  • Enjoys working on the books of accountants of the business

  • Tracks all expenditures in the business

Details and explanations offered in the entire books of accounts

All expenses can be tracked in the business

Daniel Jack

Accountant

  • Monitors and tracks financial expenses of the firm

Monitoring mechanisms of financial expenses of the firm effective

Ivan Koji

Accounts Manager

  • Oversees activities done by the junior employees

Activities performed have satisfactory

Shaw Mayor

Assistant Accountant’s Manager

  • Keeps the books of accountants and in charge of small expenses within the company

Books of accounts in order according to laid down financial procedures

John Duce

Accounts Clerk

  • Oversees payment of wages and salaries to employees

The records on salaries and wages are well articulated and each detail well presented.

Stakeholders

Current Position

Interest

Desired Position

Ability to promote transparency and accountability

Understanding of transparency and accountability

Required Support

Bill Andrew

Executive member of the Board

  • Strives for excellence in what he does

  • Enjoys trying out new ideas in business

  • Emphasizes on accountability in any business venture

It is crucial to use tools to enhance accountability

Innovative ideas should be encouraged

Transparency should be supported by all in the business ventures

Tools to perform the tasks

Catherine Martha

Executive member of the Board

  • Interested in transparency at the firm

  • Strict on junior employees

  • Keen on integrity on financial matters

Transparency has been achieved in the organization

Employees have demonstrated transparency and accountability in all undertakings –

Support by all in the firm

Edward Tim

Chief Financial Officer

  • Concerned with financial expenditures in the company

  • Cautious on inappropriate use of funds at the company

Financial expenditures have been clarified

There is appropriation of funds

Cooperation of employees in the department

Val Valeria

Financial Officer

  • Works by the rules of the organization

  • Careful on business transactions involving the use of funds

Actions should be taken to verify documents

There has been due diligence in all the transactions

Actions by those entrusted with the responsibility

Melisa Key

Deputy Financial Officer

  • Advocates transparency and accountability

  • Hard to junior staff

High levels of transparency have been achieved

Staff have been very cooperative

Dedication by all is highly encouraged

John Smith

Chief Accountant

  • Enjoys working on the books of accountants of the business

  • Tracks all expenditures in the business

The books of accounts are in sound position

Expenditures can all be verified from the available documents

Avail all necessary financial documents

Daniel Jack

Accountant

  • Monitors and tracks financial expenses of the firm

Monitoring and tracking systems have well implemented

Necessary technological capacity

Ivan Koji

Accounts Manager

  • Oversees activities all of the activities are done by the junior employees

The employees have performed their tasks appropriately and assessment indicates thoroughness and commitment

Evaluation instruments

Shaw Mayor

Assistant Accountant’s Manager

  • Keeps the books of accountants and in charge of small expenses within the company

Books of accounts in petty cash all in good order as each expense is well explained

Details of expenses of the petty cash

John Duce

Accounts Clerk

  • Oversees payment of wages and salaries to employees

Payment of wages and salaries done according to the laid down financial procedures of the firm

All receipts to facilitate settlement of wages

Figure Four: Stakeholder-based balanced scorecard

Potential Stakeholder

Contributions

Inducement

Senior leadership members

  • Provide leadership and guidance

  • Provide counsel

  • Power

  • Legacy

  • Returns

Senior leaders

  • Give advice

  • Provide guidance

  • Make time for consultation

  • Power

  • Legacy

  • Income

Other leaders

  • Management

  • Strategy

  • Governance

  • Appraisal

  • Recognition of effort

Peer groups

  • Assistance

  • Remuneration

Employees

  • Time

  • Efforts

  • Ideas

  • Results

  • Benefits

  • Compensation

  • Promotion

Fellow colleague

  • Counsel

  • Ideas

  • Compensation

Employees and other staff

  • Technical support

  • Collaboration

  • Compensation

  • Appraisal

References

Aho,M. K., &amp Bennett, E. (2013). TheMachiavellian librarian: Winning allies, combating budget cuts, andinfluencing stakeholders.Oxford: Chandos Publishing.

EuropeanCommission. (2004). LIFE-Nature:Communicating with stakeholders and the general public. Best practiceexamples for Natura 2000.Luxembourg: EUR-OP.

Larson-Keagy,E., Community College National Center for Community Engagement., &ampGlobal Engagement of Multifaceted Stakeholders (GEMS) project(2000-2003). (2003). Weare all related: Service learning, civic engagement andconnectedness.Mesa, Ariz: Community College National Center for CommunityEngagement.

McPhail,T. L. (2002). Globalcommunication: Theories, stakeholders, and trends.Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Victoria.(2005). Effectiveengagement: Building relationships with community and otherstakeholders.East Melbourne, Vic: Dept. of Sustainability and Environment.

Yoo,J.-K., &amp Asian Development Bank Institute. (2005). Partnershipswith stakeholders.Tokyo, Japan: Asian Development Bank Institute.