Interview on Different Experiences for Mothers

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The first interviewee is a 25 year old college student who gave birthto a healthy baby boy four years ago. Below is a transcript of theinterview. The text in bold represents the interview questions whilethe normal text depicts her response.

  1. How did you find out that you were pregnant?

When I started feeling sick on numerous mornings, I decided to go thenearest store to buy a pregnancy test kit. That is how I found out Iwas carrying a baby.

  1. Was this a planned pregnancy?

Haha! Of course not, it happened immediately after high school.Nobody plans to start a family at that age.

  1. How did you feel about being pregnant?

I was very scared. I remember toying around with the idea ofterminating the pregnancy. I thought that the child would inhibit mefrom reaching my full potential. I was a bright student so I did notwant a baby to prevent me from going to college

  1. Were you working at the time?

I was a student working part time. Lucky for me, I had finished allmy exams when I realized I was pregnant. I decided to work fulltimehenceforth.

  1. When did you first go see a doctor?

Immediately I told my boyfriend, he decided it was best we visitedthe doctor. It had taken me a whole fortnight to gather the courageto tell him.

  1. How often did you visit the doctor?

We visited the doctor as per the prenatal clinic appointments.

  1. Did you take childbirth classes?

I did not have the money for that. I made YouTube my friend.

  1. What were some of the things you were told to do while you were pregnant?

I was told to take enough rest, eat healthy and do light exercisesregularly.

  1. What were some of the things you were told not to do?

I was asked to stay away from drugs, alcohol, and nicotine

  1. Were any prenatal tests (i.e., ultrasound, amniocentesis, etc.) performed?

Ultra sound was a regular test for finding out the gender of thefetus and monitoring its general development.

  1. Did you take vitamins? Medicines?

I took pills for Vitamins and calcium. They said pregnant women needthem most.

  1. Did you smoke? If so, how much?

I never smoked even one stick. But I used to stay close to myboyfriend who was a chain smoker.

  1. Did you drink alcohol or take drugs? If so, how much?

I always had a craving for wine. I took at least two glasses perweek.

  1. Did you drink coffee, tea, or soft drinks? If so, how often?

I am a big fan of coffee. I used to take approximately three cups ina day

  1. Did you know the sex of the child in advance of the birth?

Yes. Through ultrasound

  1. Did you have a preference for a boy or girl?

No, I did not.

  1. What were some of the pregnancy myths you were told at the time?

I was told that if I had sex while pregnant I would have a difficultbirth

  1. How long were you in the hospital?

3 days

  1. What were the first few weeks at home like? What problems did you experience? How was having a baby different from what you expected?

I expected the baby to cry all the time but she was sleeping most ofthe time only to wake up for milk.

The next interviewee is a 54-year-old woman who had her only child 27years ago.

  1. How did you find out that you were pregnant?

My periods were late for 4 weeks, so I went to the hospital to takethe test.

  1. Was this a planned pregnancy?

Yes it was. We had been married for two years

  1. How did you feel about being pregnant?

I was excited that I was finally going to have a baby

  1. Were you working at the time?

I had recently graduated college and I was on my first job.

  1. When did you first go see a doctor?

I first went to see the doctor when I suspected that I was pregnant.

  1. How often did you visit the doctor?

I did it every month

  1. Did you take childbirth classes?

Yes I did.

  1. What were some of the things you were told to do while you were pregnant?

I was told to eat healthy, exercise regularly, and take long naps.During the last stages of the pregnancy, my doctor advised me to stopworking.

  1. What were some of the things you were told not to do?

I was told not to indulge in activities that would cause stress,avoid smoking, alcohol and drugs.

  1. Were any prenatal tests (i.e., ultrasound, amniocentesis, etc.) performed?

Back then prenatal tests such as ultrasound were performed when thepregnancy developed complications. Mine was normal so I did notundergo any prenatal tests.

  1. Did you take vitamins? Medicines?

My health was okay so the doctors did not see the need to givevitamins and any other medicines.

  1. Did you smoke? If so, how much?

I never smoked. The pregnancy made me detest the smell of tobacco.

  1. Did you drink alcohol or take drugs? If so, how much?

My mother in law would not let me take wine. She said it was bad forthe baby.

  1. Did you drink coffee, tea, or soft drinks? If so, how often?

I was not a fan of coffee or tea. I used to take soda once in awhile.

  1. Did you know the sex of the child in advance of the birth?

Back in the day, we used to wait until the baby was born before wecould know its sex.

  1. Did you have a preference for a boy or girl?

My mother in law wanted a grandson because she already had manygranddaughters. That was my preferred sex too.

  1. What were some of the pregnancy myths you were told at the time?

I was told that if I kept getting moody, I would give birth to amoody baby.

  1. How long were you in the hospital?

I stayed in hospital for a week

  1. What were the first few weeks at home like? What problems did you experience? How was having a baby different from what you expected?

The first few weeks were a challenge. The baby kept crying all thetime. My breasts could not dispense enough milk. I also realized thatchanging diapers was a challenge in actual practice.

Similarities and differences

Both interviewees seem to agree that healthy eating and avoidingsubstance abuse is important to safeguard the health of the unbornchild (Enkin et al, 2000). The primary difference between the twomothers is the age at which they gave birth. Whilst the firstinterviewee gave birth in high school, the latter did it aftercollege. The second correspondent appears to be more conservative andprescribes to the expectations of society- having children aftermarriage. On the other hand, the first interviewee seems rebelliousand has no qualms about having a baby out of wedlock.

Correlation of the responses with class material

The women seem to be psychologically prepared before they had birthhence it did not turn out to be a traumatic event. The secondinterviewee attended childbirth classes while the first one talked tofriends with babies. Preparation is a key area prior to childbirth.Research has shown that childbirth falls under traumatic events thatare capable of causing posttraumatic stress on young mothers (Ross etal, 2006). Having a glimpse on what the process entails will go along way in preparing the expectant mother. Some of the methods thatexpectant mothers can use to prepare themselves for childbirthinclude attending childbirth classes, watching videos of the processand talking to elders with relevant experience.

Works Cited

Enkin, M., Keirse, M. J., Chalmers, I., &amp Enkin, E. (2000). Aguide to effective care in pregnancy and childbirth (Vol. 525).Oxford: Oxford university press.

First interviewee. The experiences of childbirth. [PersonalInterview]. March, 2016.

Ross, L. E., McLean, L. M., &amp Psych, C. (2006). Anxiety disordersduring pregnancy and the postpartum period: a systematic review.depression, 6(9).

Second Interviewee. Personal story of childbirth. [Personalinterview]. March, 2016.